Portable Rugged Tablets are a Game Changer for Emergency Medicine

FR1The emergency medical industry is in desperate need of better and faster portable devices that can help them save lives when minutes count. In the clinic, doctor’s office, or hospital, medical tablets are becoming a common sight. Now rugged tablets are changing the ER and in the field emergency response by providing connectivity, reliability, and real time communications for better patient care.

With the portability and functionality of a tablet, emergency response teams can easily take all the information they need with them from ambulance to patient side and back again. This portability means having access to real time instructions form the hospital and even access to patient files if available via compliant devices that secure patient privacy while allowing immediate access to vital information required to save lives.

Once a patient is placed in the ambulance, the tablet can work even harder, analyzing data from various devices used to monitor and track the patient’s condition, and syncing all information on the patient with the receiving hospital and the medical team that will take over care. Doctors awaiting patient arrival can create plans for treatment before the patient enters the ER bay, and spring into action to provide immediate, accurate and effective care.

Tablet cameras can be used to document patient condition, care, and progress from field to ambulance and through hand off to the next medical team. RFID and bar code scanners can be utilized to track patient ID tags and equipment inventory tags, and provide a simplified mode of collaborative effort, passed from emergency tech to doctor or nurse and back again once information is transferred securely to the hospital network.

When in a patient’s home for a well check or an emergency call that ends up not requiring transport, medical tablets can also be used by response teams to gather information, document the incident, and transmit information to the correct medical practitioner, clinic, hospital or professional overseeing the patient’s home care. This is particularly valuable in hospice situations when transport to a medical center is not wished but patient care must be tracked diligently and the incident documented to leave a clear record of events.

From the field to the ambulance to the hospital and back to the field, medical tablets are becoming the primary tool emergency technicians will depend on for the foreseeable future.